Reproducibility Pioneers: Political Scientists Assigning Replications to Students

Here are innovative and exciting syllabi of methods courses assigning replication studies to students. The instructors ensure that we build up a cohort of students who value reproducibility, while learning statistics at the same time.
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For your ISA 2014 schedule in Toronto: Reproducibility Friday March 28, 2014 at 8.15 and 10.30am

isaThis is your chance to discuss replication & reproducibility in International Replations at ISA 2014 in Toronto on Friday, March 28.

Panel 1:

8:15 AM – 10:00 AM (brownie points for those coming so early!)
FA10: Replication in International Relations: How Journal Data Policies and Replication in Teaching Can Improve Reproducibility Standards
(Room: Willow Center, Sheraton Centre Toronto)

Panel 2:

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM
FB10: Replication in International Relations: Successes and Failures in Practice
(Same room)

Directions

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Paper on measuring terrorism using replication data

An exciting paper at ISA’s 55th Annual Convention in Toronto tackles the challenge to find alternative operationalizations of terrorism using replication data. Join the disussion on Thursday, March 27, 2014 (10.30am).
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Why we all want ‘others’ to do replication studies

Reproducibility is held as the gold standard for scientific research. The legitimacy of any published work depends on the question: can we replicate the analysis and come to the same results? Therefore, authors have to provide information on how exactly they collected the data and conducted the analysis. Without such transparency about the research process, scholars cannot evaluate work, fully understand the value of results, and move on to build further, new knowledge, as King (1995) has pointed out. But why are so few scholars doing replication studies?
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Replication in International Relations: Successes & Failures in Practice

isa2The largest International Relations conference, ISA’s 55th Annual Convention (March 26-29, 2014), features two panels on replication and reproducibility this year. The second panel covers “Replication in International Relations: Successes & Failures in Practice.”
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Replication in International Relations: How Journal Data Policies & Replication in Teaching Can Improve Reproducibility Standards

isaThe largest International Relations conference, ISA’s 55th Annual Convention (March 26-29, 2014), features two panels on replication and reproducibility this year. The first panel covers “Replication in International Relations: How Journal Data Policies and Replication in Teaching Can Improve Reproducibility Standards.”
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Reblog: Teaching reproducibility at Cambridge

Screen Shot 2014-02-13 at 6.12.28 PMQuality standards in the sciences have recently been heavily criticised in the academic community and the mass media. Scandals involving fraud, errors or misconduct have stirred a debate on reproducibility that calls for fundamental changes in the way research is done. As a new teaching course at Cambridge shows, the best way to bring about change is to start in the classroom. An earlier version of this article was published at the University of Cambridge webpage.
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Replication Workshop: What frustrated students the most, and why they still liked the course

The Cambridge Replication Workshop 2013/14 just finished. In eight sessions, graduate students replicated a published paper and learned about reproducibility standards. This is a summary of student feedback on data transparency and the course itself. Some were extremely frustrated, a few dropped out, and those who stayed found the course “fantastic” and “incredible”.

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Reblog: Replication in political science graduate courses: an untapped resource?

Screen Shot 2014-02-12 at 8.18.42 PMA post I published with Seth Werfel and Stephanie Wykstra on The Monkey Cage blog discusses survey results about replication projects assigned in graduate courses.
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Many academic journals hesitate to publish replications

While most political scientists would agree that replications and cross-checks advance knowledge, many academic journals hesitate to publish replications. John Ishiyama, University of North Texas, discusses how replication studies can get published to create more incentives to do replications.
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