Tag Archives: reproducible research

Reproducible research on coursera: Week 2 introduces knitr and R Markdown

I’m doing the free Coursera course on reproducibility by Johns Hopkins University to improve my own teaching. Week 2 introduces knitr and R Markdown, two core tools to create reproducible research.

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Learning about Reproducible Research on Coursera: Recap Week 1

I’m doing the free Coursera course on reproducibility by Johns Hopkins University to improve my own teaching. Week 1 gave a great introduction into why reproducible research is important, what literate statistical programming means, and which software is worth learning for your career.
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Free Reproducible Research Course Online

Screen Shot 2014-05-05 at 8.07.08 PMIn an excellent move to bring reproducible research to everyone for free, Johns Hopkins University now offers a four-weeks course on Coursera. The course provides videos and exercises to learn statistical analysis tools that allow others to replicate your work easily. The course starts May 5.
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Why we all want ‘others’ to do replication studies

Reproducibility is held as the gold standard for scientific research. The legitimacy of any published work depends on the question: can we replicate the analysis and come to the same results? Therefore, authors have to provide information on how exactly they collected the data and conducted the analysis. Without such transparency about the research process, scholars cannot evaluate work, fully understand the value of results, and move on to build further, new knowledge, as King (1995) has pointed out. But why are so few scholars doing replication studies?
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Replication Workshop: What frustrated students the most, and why they still liked the course

The Cambridge Replication Workshop 2013/14 just finished. In eight sessions, graduate students replicated a published paper and learned about reproducibility standards. This is a summary of student feedback on data transparency and the course itself. Some were extremely frustrated, a few dropped out, and those who stayed found the course “fantastic” and “incredible”.

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