Category Archives: data repositories

Balancing Ethics and Transparency (part II): publishing sensitive data

More and more funders and journals require data management plans and public access to all types of research data. At the same time, many researchers struggle to balance transparency against legal and ethical obligations. Following on part I of this blog post, what are some simple guidelines on how to share sensitive data?

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Political Scientists Trying to Delay Research Transparency

A group of 625 political scientists signed a petition to delay the new APSA guidelines for transparency. They want to discuss the implications for qualitative data, hand-written field notes and confidential data first. I agree that practical discussions are necessary – but this should not be a reason to abandon the transparency guidelines.
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Guest Post: Research Data Review is Gaining Ground, by L. Peer and A. Green

Data Review ReplicationThis we know: Sharing research data with the goal of advancing science is slowly becoming the norm in many disciplines, and a rich ecosystem has sprung up in recent years to support that effort. Yes, technological and cultural challenges remain, but anyone watching this space would agree that much progress has been made. A guest post by Limor Peer and Ann Green.

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Share your replication: Political Science Replication Initiative

Screen Shot 2014-08-29 at 5.56.57 PMEarlier this year, we sent out a survey on replication in political science to the Political Methodology (PolMeth) mailing list. Our survey results, which we wrote up in a post on the Monkey Cage blog, indicated quite a bit of interest in a site to share replication studies.
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Guest Post: Leading international studies journal takes replication seriously, by Joseph Young

Transparency and data access – these public goods are crucial principals for science. But why don’t researchers implement them? Political scientist Joseph K. Young discusses incentives for reproducibility, and how he is tracking down old replication data for the leading international studies journal ISQ.
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Guest Post: Two simple things to make your research more reproducible, by Thomas Wallis

In this guest post, experimental psychologist Thomas Wallis (University of Tübingen) proposes two simple ideas how you can make your work more reproducible.
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Guest Post: Be a better scientist – how to make your scientific output more credible, by Thomas Leeper

Thomas Leeper, a political scientist at Aarhus University, recently wrote about where to store your replication data. In his second post, he explains what kind of data to archive, and why that makes you a better scientist. His post is packed with concrete steps and state-of-the-art software tips.
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