Tag Archives: political science

Guest Post: Two simple things to make your research more reproducible, by Thomas Wallis

In this guest post, experimental psychologist Thomas Wallis (University of Tübingen) proposes two simple ideas how you can make your work more reproducible.
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Guest Post: Be a better scientist – how to make your scientific output more credible, by Thomas Leeper

Thomas Leeper, a political scientist at Aarhus University, recently wrote about where to store your replication data. In his second post, he explains what kind of data to archive, and why that makes you a better scientist. His post is packed with concrete steps and state-of-the-art software tips.
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Guest Post: Archive your data or they die with you, by Thomas Leeper

Thomas Leeper is a political scientist at Aarhus University and focuses on public opinion, political psychology, and experimental methods. I invited him to write a guest post because he is a contributing developer for the rOpenGov and rOpenSci open source software projects. He also wrote the very useful dvn package that connects the statistical software R and the data archive Dataverse. In his post, Leeper explains why there is no reproducibility without proper data archiving.
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Replication in political science: why implementation lags behind the ideal

Embedding reproducibility in political science teaching is challenging. How should it be done? Which courses integrate replication studies already? And can it do harm to let graduate students replicate published work?
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Reproducibility Pioneers: Political Scientists Assigning Replications to Students

Here are innovative and exciting syllabi of methods courses assigning replication studies to students. The instructors ensure that we build up a cohort of students who value reproducibility, while learning statistics at the same time.
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Why we all want ‘others’ to do replication studies

Reproducibility is held as the gold standard for scientific research. The legitimacy of any published work depends on the question: can we replicate the analysis and come to the same results? Therefore, authors have to provide information on how exactly they collected the data and conducted the analysis. Without such transparency about the research process, scholars cannot evaluate work, fully understand the value of results, and move on to build further, new knowledge, as King (1995) has pointed out. But why are so few scholars doing replication studies?
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Reblog: Replication in political science graduate courses: an untapped resource?

Screen Shot 2014-02-12 at 8.18.42 PMA post I published with Seth Werfel and Stephanie Wykstra on The Monkey Cage blog discusses survey results about replication projects assigned in graduate courses.
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Many academic journals hesitate to publish replications

While most political scientists would agree that replications and cross-checks advance knowledge, many academic journals hesitate to publish replications. John Ishiyama, University of North Texas, discusses how replication studies can get published to create more incentives to do replications.
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Networking among teachers assigning replications

Screen Shot 2014-01-18 at 3.30.57 PMI’m part of an initiative to promote replications of quantitative work in political science. We aim to create a site that will publish and organize replications done by graduate students in their courses, and to help teachers exchange challenges and pitfalls in using replications for teaching.
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Would journals publish only failed replications?

Scholars in political science commonly agree that we need more researchers doing replications of published work. But how to motivate them? In the recent symposium on the topic in PS: Political Science & Politics (Vol 47, Issue 1), Thomas M. Carsey discusses concrete steps researchers and journals can take. This blog post is part of a series of posts about the PS symposium, which summarizes and discusses the current state of reproducibility in political science.
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