Tag Archives: open data

Currently swamped – but I’m sending my data soon

Nicole,

I would be more than happy to share my data with you, but I am currently swamped and have not had time to clean up the dataset that you requested. Normally, this wouldn’t take much but was originally part of a larger dataset that I had created, and that dataset includes data from other authors which did not give me permission to share (Don’t worry – this data is nothing used in the article). It will likely be a few weeks before I can get to this. Will this be too late?

Out of curiously, what type of project are you working on that you would need the dataset? (…)

Best,
______________

I sent two follow-up emails. The author never replied again.

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Best of replication & data sharing: Collection 5 (Nov 2013)

bestofThese are the best pieces I came across in the last month on replication, reproducibility & data sharing. Collection #5 (Nov 2013).
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Best of replication & data sharing: Collection 4 (Oct 2013)

bestofThese are the best pieces I came across in the last month on replication, reproducibility & data sharing. With the Economist and the LA times reporting on reproducibility, everyone talks about the topic. Collection #4 (October 2013).
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Science deserves better

In a new paper, Allan Dafoe (Yale University), examines the availability of replication data in top political science journals – and comes to mixed conclusions.
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Incentive to share your data: how to get cited

A workshop recap by the Open Economics Working Group has a great section on how to create incentive structures for scholars to share their work. The main goal is to make your data citable – and here’s how to make it work.
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Replication chains: Political tolerance taken apart

Screen Shot 2013-03-08 at 6.28.24 PMHow would you like it if someone replicated your paper? Will it help you, and give you more citations, or will it cause rage? Some authors defend their original work against replication by writing an ‘answer’ paper, and they might claim that the replication was fundamentally flawed or contained statistical and reporting errors. Here’s another interesting replication chain.
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Replication chains: voter calls and turnout

Screen Shot 2013-03-08 at 6.28.24 PMSometimes an author, when being replicated by someone, answers to that replication in a new paper. In that new paper (s)he again might replicate some of the disputed results. Most authors defend their earlier paper by claiming that the replication was: fundamentally flawed, contains statistical and reporting errors, is of trivial nature, or less realistic and of limited utility. Such replication chains are not just entertaining academic slugfest, but they are useful because they provide detailed discussions about data and methods in the field.
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Only 18 of 120 political science journals have a replication policy

Screen Shot 2013-03-08 at 6.37.24 PMA recent article in “European Political Science” found that out of 120 political science journals only 18 have replication policies. The authors found that the existence of a data policy was correlated with the impact factor, type of audience, and age of the journal. Their analysis confirms that the state of reproducibility and political science is substandard.
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Getting published by replicating work

There are three motivations to replicate someone else’s work. First, you learn statistics and methods. Second, you provide a service to the community by advancing knowledge and validating results. Third, and most importantly for many, if you add value, you can get it published. Here are some success stories from the social sciences about papers that got published by replicating existing work.
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I just published my qualitative data – 5 years after book publication

civil-religion-headQualitative data can be made available for replication. I have been advocating this by interviewing Todd Landman and Ingo Rohlfing on my blog. It suddenly occurred to me that I don’t have my own qualitative data published. They are now on the Dataverse. I admit that I had to dig deep in on my external hard drive to find them again.
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