Category Archives: reproducible research

Methods vs Insights #4: The four stages of a project (and the fifth you should avoid)

Reproducibility is one of the hardest stages in a research project. Here are tips for writing successful papers in any field, re-blogged from the Scientific B-Sides Blog.

Scientific B-sides

Methods vs Insights is back. Today with a discussion of general research practice.

Most projects in my lab take years from start to finish. So it is important for me to manage the expectations my students and postdocs may have. Here is a plot I have developed to discuss the different stages of a scientific project with them and to prepare them for what’s ahead.

The four stages of a scientific project: Explore! Dig! Refine! Sell! And the stage you want to avoid: Waste! Plus the prevalent emotion in each stage and the key skill you will need to successfully navigate it. The four stages of a scientific project: Explore! Dig! Refine! Sell! And the stage you want to avoid: Waste! Plus the prevalent emotion in each stage and the key skill you will need to successfully navigate it. (x-axis it time, y-axis is work you’ve put in.)

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Guest Post: Archive your data or they die with you, by Thomas Leeper

Thomas Leeper is a political scientist at Aarhus University and focuses on public opinion, political psychology, and experimental methods. I invited him to write a guest post because he is a contributing developer for the rOpenGov and rOpenSci open source software projects. He also wrote the very useful dvn package that connects the statistical software R and the data archive Dataverse. In his post, Leeper explains why there is no reproducibility without proper data archiving.
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Reproducible research on coursera: Week 2 introduces knitr and R Markdown

I’m doing the free Coursera course on reproducibility by Johns Hopkins University to improve my own teaching. Week 2 introduces knitr and R Markdown, two core tools to create reproducible research.

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Learning about Reproducible Research on Coursera: Recap Week 1

I’m doing the free Coursera course on reproducibility by Johns Hopkins University to improve my own teaching. Week 1 gave a great introduction into why reproducible research is important, what literate statistical programming means, and which software is worth learning for your career.
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Free Reproducible Research Course Online

Screen Shot 2014-05-05 at 8.07.08 PMIn an excellent move to bring reproducible research to everyone for free, Johns Hopkins University now offers a four-weeks course on Coursera. The course provides videos and exercises to learn statistical analysis tools that allow others to replicate your work easily. The course starts May 5.
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Replication in political science: why implementation lags behind the ideal

Embedding reproducibility in political science teaching is challenging. How should it be done? Which courses integrate replication studies already? And can it do harm to let graduate students replicate published work?
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For your ISA 2014 schedule in Toronto: Reproducibility Friday March 28, 2014 at 8.15 and 10.30am

isaThis is your chance to discuss replication & reproducibility in International Replations at ISA 2014 in Toronto on Friday, March 28.

Panel 1:

8:15 AM – 10:00 AM (brownie points for those coming so early!)
FA10: Replication in International Relations: How Journal Data Policies and Replication in Teaching Can Improve Reproducibility Standards
(Room: Willow Center, Sheraton Centre Toronto)

Panel 2:

10:30 AM – 12:15 PM
FB10: Replication in International Relations: Successes and Failures in Practice
(Same room)

Directions

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Why we all want ‘others’ to do replication studies

Reproducibility is held as the gold standard for scientific research. The legitimacy of any published work depends on the question: can we replicate the analysis and come to the same results? Therefore, authors have to provide information on how exactly they collected the data and conducted the analysis. Without such transparency about the research process, scholars cannot evaluate work, fully understand the value of results, and move on to build further, new knowledge, as King (1995) has pointed out. But why are so few scholars doing replication studies?
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Replication in International Relations: Successes & Failures in Practice

isa2The largest International Relations conference, ISA’s 55th Annual Convention (March 26-29, 2014), features two panels on replication and reproducibility this year. The second panel covers “Replication in International Relations: Successes & Failures in Practice.”
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Replication in International Relations: How Journal Data Policies & Replication in Teaching Can Improve Reproducibility Standards

isaThe largest International Relations conference, ISA’s 55th Annual Convention (March 26-29, 2014), features two panels on replication and reproducibility this year. The first panel covers “Replication in International Relations: How Journal Data Policies and Replication in Teaching Can Improve Reproducibility Standards.”
Continue reading

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