Category Archives: Replication Workshop

Navigating the Winds of Change: A Grad Student’s Journey Through the Replication Crisis, by Matthew J. Samson

One of the graduate students in my Replication Workshop writes about replication, the reproducibility crisis and validity in experimental psychology.
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Reblog: Teaching reproducibility at Cambridge

Screen Shot 2014-02-13 at 6.12.28 PMQuality standards in the sciences have recently been heavily criticised in the academic community and the mass media. Scandals involving fraud, errors or misconduct have stirred a debate on reproducibility that calls for fundamental changes in the way research is done. As a new teaching course at Cambridge shows, the best way to bring about change is to start in the classroom. An earlier version of this article was published at the University of Cambridge webpage.
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Replication Workshop: What frustrated students the most, and why they still liked the course

The Cambridge Replication Workshop 2013/14 just finished. In eight sessions, graduate students replicated a published paper and learned about reproducibility standards. This is a summary of student feedback on data transparency and the course itself. Some were extremely frustrated, a few dropped out, and those who stayed found the course “fantastic” and “incredible”.

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Promoting replications in graduate student teaching

A great way to promote reproducibility in political science is to let graduate students replicate published work. This way, they learn ‘hands-on’ statistics, but also how frustrating it is when authors don’t keep a log of their files and code. In the best case scenario, this encourages a new cohort of political scientists to be transparent in their future work. In the recent symposium on reproducibility in PS: Political Science & Politics (Vol 47, Issue 1), Thomas M. Carsey discusses his experiences of assigning replications to students – a thought-provoking and excellent read! [This blog post is part of a series of posts about the PS symposium, which summarizes and discusses the current state of reproducibility in political science.]
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Reblog: Social science and replication

My colleague Alex Sutherland (Twitter: @as2140) and I have written a short piece on replication for the Alliance for Useful Evidence Blog.
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Setting up a replication workshop: Why it’s worth it & what to do better

More and more scholars integrate replication into their teaching, for example Gary King, Victoria Stodden, Chris Fariss, Jamie Monogan. With the second edition of the Replication Workshop starting today, here’s why it’s worth it, and how to improve teaching that includes replication – based on what my TAs said after the last Cambridge Replication Workshop.
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Setting up a replication workshop: Target audience & Software

More and more scholars integrate replication into their teaching. In a previous post, I wrote about challenges during the Cambridge Replication Workshop, where students replicated a published paper in eight weeks. For anyone planning to design a similar course, here are thoughts on a good target audience, and why the course should use R instead of STATA or SPSS.
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