Category Archives: replication success

Guest Post: Six Crucial Steps to Strengthen a Replication, by Mallory Kidwell

Scientific research advances knowledge by making transparent the methodology and evidence supporting scientific claims. This way, others can evaluate the basis of evidence and repeat the research in order to confirm the conclusions. However, the current incentive structures emphasizing publication can cause a disconnect between the valued ideals and daily practices of individual researchers.
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Paper on measuring terrorism using replication data

An exciting paper at ISA’s 55th Annual Convention in Toronto tackles the challenge to find alternative operationalizations of terrorism using replication data. Join the disussion on Thursday, March 27, 2014 (10.30am).
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Academic slugfest & replication chains: getting replicated hurts

Screen Shot 2013-03-08 at 6.28.24 PMGetting replicated gives you citations, but it hurts. Often, authors respond with a paper to defend their earlier work. They often claim the replication was: fundamentally flawed, contains statistical and reporting errors, is of trivial nature, or less realistic and of limited utility. Such replication chains are not just entertaining academic slugfest, but they are useful because they provide discussions about data and methods.
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Replication chains: Political tolerance taken apart

Screen Shot 2013-03-08 at 6.28.24 PMHow would you like it if someone replicated your paper? Will it help you, and give you more citations, or will it cause rage? Some authors defend their original work against replication by writing an ‘answer’ paper, and they might claim that the replication was fundamentally flawed or contained statistical and reporting errors. Here’s another interesting replication chain.
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7 good reasons why we should replicate existing work

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Why should we replicate published papers? Isn’t it a waste of time, given that journals and universities expect you to create original research? In the Cambridge Replication Workshop I discussed this with my students. Here are 7 good reasons why we should replicate existing work – beyond the ‘getting published’ argument.
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Academic slugfest: the wonderful world of replication chains

Screen Shot 2013-03-08 at 6.28.24 PMSometimes an author, when being replicated by someone, answers to that replication in a new paper. In that new paper (s)he again might replicate some of the disputed results. Most authors defend their earlier paper by claiming that the replication was: fundamentally flawed, contains statistical and reporting errors, is of trivial nature, or less realistic and of limited utility. Such replication chains are not just entertaining academic slugfest, but they are useful because they provide detailed discussions about data and methods in the field.
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Getting published by replicating work

There are three motivations to replicate someone else’s work. First, you learn statistics and methods. Second, you provide a service to the community by advancing knowledge and validating results. Third, and most importantly for many, if you add value, you can get it published. Here are some success stories from the social sciences about papers that got published by replicating existing work.
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