Category Archives: replication publication

“Replication Bullying:” Who replicates the replicators?

A recent special issue in Social Psychology adds fuel to the debate on data transparency and faulty research. Following an innovative approach, the journal published failed and successful replications instead of typical research papers. A Cambridge scholar, whose paper could not be replicated, now feels treated unfairly by the “data detectives.” She says that the replicators had aimed to “declare the verdict” that they failed to reproduce her results. Her response raises important questions for replications, reproducibility and research transparency.

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Replication in International Relations: Successes & Failures in Practice

isa2The largest International Relations conference, ISA’s 55th Annual Convention (March 26-29, 2014), features two panels on replication and reproducibility this year. The second panel covers “Replication in International Relations: Successes & Failures in Practice.”
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Many academic journals hesitate to publish replications

While most political scientists would agree that replications and cross-checks advance knowledge, many academic journals hesitate to publish replications. John Ishiyama, University of North Texas, discusses how replication studies can get published to create more incentives to do replications.
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Replication & Reproducibility 2013: The best stories

replication_head_smWhen I started the Political Science Replication blog in early 2013, I mainly wanted to channel my frustration of authors not sharing their data into a blog. 12 months later, the debate on replication and reproducibility in the social sciences has moved towards a strong push for openness and transparency. Here are the best stories of 2013, including #overlyhonestmethods, Reinhart-Rogoff, and the replication initiatives in Psychology and Cancer research.
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Can the replication movement be harmful: The discussion continues

I recently wrote a piece reacting to Mina Bissell’s article on the risks of the replication drive. Now that American statistician and political scientist Andrew Gelman blogged about the topic, the discussion continues. According to Gelman, “the push for replication is so strong that now there’s a backlash against it”.
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Guest post: How to persuade journals to accept your replication paper

MIT students Mark Bell and Nicholas Miller recently got their replication paper “Questioning the Effect of Nuclear Weapons on Conflict” accepted by the Journal of Conflict Resolution. They wrote the paper as an assignment for Gary King‘s class on Advanced Quantitative Research Methodology. They first published their analysis on a dataverse, and then rewrote the paper for the journal. In this guest post they show how they persuaded the journal and its reviewers to publish the replication.
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Incentive to share your data: how to get cited

A workshop recap by the Open Economics Working Group has a great section on how to create incentive structures for scholars to share their work. The main goal is to make your data citable – and here’s how to make it work.
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