Category Archives: replication publication

Replication & Reproducibility 2013: The best stories

replication_head_smWhen I started the Political Science Replication blog in early 2013, I mainly wanted to channel my frustration of authors not sharing their data into a blog. 12 months later, the debate on replication and reproducibility in the social sciences has moved towards a strong push for openness and transparency. Here are the best stories of 2013, including #overlyhonestmethods, Reinhart-Rogoff, and the replication initiatives in Psychology and Cancer research.
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Can the replication movement be harmful: The discussion continues

I recently wrote a piece reacting to Mina Bissell’s article on the risks of the replication drive. Now that American statistician and political scientist Andrew Gelman blogged about the topic, the discussion continues. According to Gelman, “the push for replication is so strong that now there’s a backlash against it”.
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Guest post: How to persuade journals to accept your replication paper

MIT students Mark Bell and Nicholas Miller recently got their replication paper “Questioning the Effect of Nuclear Weapons on Conflict” accepted by the Journal of Conflict Resolution. They wrote the paper as an assignment for Gary King‘s class on Advanced Quantitative Research Methodology. They first published their analysis on a dataverse, and then rewrote the paper for the journal. In this guest post they show how they persuaded the journal and its reviewers to publish the replication.
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Incentive to share your data: how to get cited

A workshop recap by the Open Economics Working Group has a great section on how to create incentive structures for scholars to share their work. The main goal is to make your data citable – and here’s how to make it work.
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Replication chains: international trade and democracies

Screen Shot 2013-03-08 at 6.28.24 PMGetting replicated gives you citations, but it hurts. Often, authors respond with a paper to defend their earlier work. They often claim the replication was: fundamentally flawed, contains statistical and reporting errors, is of trivial nature, or less realistic and of limited utility. Such replication chains are not just entertaining academic slugfest, but they are useful because they provide discussions about data and methods.
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Rejected from journal because it’s a replication?

This is a case from psycholinguistics, but it’s interesting for the political science replication debate as well. The journal Applied Psycholinguistics rejected a re-analysis of a paper after a 20-month review process. The original paper was published in the same journal.
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Replication scandal: We might not need austerity measures after all

Screen Shot 2013-04-17 at 8.08.34 AMEconomists Carmen Reinhart and Kenneth Rogoff claim in “Growth in a Time of Debt” that countries with debt-to-GDP ratios above 90 percent have a slightly negative average growth rate. Their paper is one of the most cited by governments to justify austerity measures – and it might be wrong, as a replication paper shows.
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Publishing as a grad student: replication helps

Screen Shot 2013-04-10 at 8.30.34 PMA new article in Political Science & Politics claims that replication can be a “potential route” to get a class paper published early in your career. Below are tips from the paper how to make this work.

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Replication chains: Political tolerance taken apart

Screen Shot 2013-03-08 at 6.28.24 PMHow would you like it if someone replicated your paper? Will it help you, and give you more citations, or will it cause rage? Some authors defend their original work against replication by writing an ‘answer’ paper, and they might claim that the replication was fundamentally flawed or contained statistical and reporting errors. Here’s another interesting replication chain.
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Replication chains: voter calls and turnout

Screen Shot 2013-03-08 at 6.28.24 PMSometimes an author, when being replicated by someone, answers to that replication in a new paper. In that new paper (s)he again might replicate some of the disputed results. Most authors defend their earlier paper by claiming that the replication was: fundamentally flawed, contains statistical and reporting errors, is of trivial nature, or less realistic and of limited utility. Such replication chains are not just entertaining academic slugfest, but they are useful because they provide detailed discussions about data and methods in the field.
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