Category Archives: journals & replication

Journal introduces replication pre-check

Many political journals have no replication policy, or only implement it half-heartedly. Now a leading journal introduces innovative guidelines for authors that include a verification of the analysis before publication.
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Checklist for a Gold Standard Replication

Screen Shot 2014-12-14 at 15.37.50Many social scientists agree that replication studies are necessary to provide quality standards in research. But how does a good replication study look like? Here is the checklist I will use in my Replication Workshop.
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Repost: Do Political Scientists Care About Effect Sizes – Replication and Type M Errors

Repost of an article by Christoper Gandrud: Reproducibility has come a long way in political science. Many major journals now require replication materials be made available either on their websites or some service such as the Dataverse Network. This is certainly progress. But what are political scientists actually supposed to do with this new information?

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Guest Post: Leading international studies journal takes replication seriously, by Joseph Young

Transparency and data access – these public goods are crucial principals for science. But why don’t researchers implement them? Political scientist Joseph K. Young discusses incentives for reproducibility, and how he is tracking down old replication data for the leading international studies journal ISQ.
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Against publication bias: Politics journal invites pre-registered papers

After fields like Psychology have explored pre-registration of studies, now Political Science follows the trend for more transparency in research. A high ranking journal, Comparative Political Studies, plans a special issue in which all papers have to be pre-registered and are submitted without the results section. I asked Michael Findley, one of the editors behind the initative, about publication bias and transparency in the field. Continue reading

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“Replication Bullying:” Who replicates the replicators?

A recent special issue in Social Psychology adds fuel to the debate on data transparency and faulty research. Following an innovative approach, the journal published failed and successful replications instead of typical research papers. A Cambridge scholar, whose paper could not be replicated, now feels treated unfairly by the “data detectives.” She says that the replicators had aimed to “declare the verdict” that they failed to reproduce her results. Her response raises important questions for replications, reproducibility and research transparency.

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Replication in political science: why implementation lags behind the ideal

Embedding reproducibility in political science teaching is challenging. How should it be done? Which courses integrate replication studies already? And can it do harm to let graduate students replicate published work?
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Why we all want ‘others’ to do replication studies

Reproducibility is held as the gold standard for scientific research. The legitimacy of any published work depends on the question: can we replicate the analysis and come to the same results? Therefore, authors have to provide information on how exactly they collected the data and conducted the analysis. Without such transparency about the research process, scholars cannot evaluate work, fully understand the value of results, and move on to build further, new knowledge, as King (1995) has pointed out. But why are so few scholars doing replication studies?
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Replication in International Relations: Successes & Failures in Practice

isa2The largest International Relations conference, ISA’s 55th Annual Convention (March 26-29, 2014), features two panels on replication and reproducibility this year. The second panel covers “Replication in International Relations: Successes & Failures in Practice.”
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Replication in International Relations: How Journal Data Policies & Replication in Teaching Can Improve Reproducibility Standards

isaThe largest International Relations conference, ISA’s 55th Annual Convention (March 26-29, 2014), features two panels on replication and reproducibility this year. The first panel covers “Replication in International Relations: How Journal Data Policies and Replication in Teaching Can Improve Reproducibility Standards.”
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